How to install Ubuntu in OS X using Parallels – a complete walkthrough

Update: this tutorial covers installing Ubuntu 6.06.1. If you’re looking for help installing Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) please see this tutorial.

This tutorial will take you every single step of the way through installing Ubuntu 6.06 using Parallels for OS X. In other words, even your parents should be able to follow along.

1. Who this tutorial is for
2. Background
3. Setting up Parallels for Ubuntu
4. Running Ubuntu for the first time
5. Installing Ubuntu
6. Internet Troubleshooting


Who this tutorial is for

This tutorial is for anyone with an Intel based Mac who is curious about Linux – specifically Ubuntu, and has about an hour to kill (not including the time it takes to download Ubuntu).

The steps and screenshots used for this tutorial are specific to Parallels Build 1848 running on a MacBook Pro w/ OS X (10.4.7). With that said, they will be nearly identical if you have a Mac Pro, Mac Mini, MacBook or any other Intel based Apple Mac.

Background

Ubuntu is a free, open source Linux-based operating system a clear focus on the user and usability (it should “Just Work”). When you finish your Ubuntu installation your system is immediately usable. On the desktop you have a full set of business productivity applications, internet applications, drawing and graphics applications, and games. For more information on Ubuntu, visit http://www.ubuntu.com/ubuntu.

As you may have noticed, here at Simplehelp we often recommend software, and 90-something percent of the time that software is free. Parallels isn’t free, but it really is worth the cost. It will allow you to run other operating systems (like Ubuntu) on your Mac – without having to worry about any of your OS X settings, documents or files being accidentally deleted. And if you don’t like Ubuntu you can trash it and carry on like it never happened.

One other (major) benefit of using Parallels is that you run the other operating system (in this case Ubuntu) while OS X is running. You don’t need to restart your computer each time you want to switch from OS X to Ubuntu and vice-versa.

Read more about Parallels here: Parallels Desktop 6.0 for Machere.


Before you start – make sure to download Ubuntu from http://www.ubuntu.com/download. The file you’ll want to download (as of 9/17/06) is ubuntu-6.06.1-desktop-i386.iso. Also, make sure Parallels Desktop is installed.


Setting up Parallels for Ubuntu

  1. If this is the first time you’re using Parallels, the Wizard will launch automatically. If it’s not the first time you’ve used Parallels, launch the Wizard by selecting New VM

  2. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  3. Click Next after reviewing the first screen

  4. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  5. Select Create a custom VM configuration and click Next

  6. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  7. Select Linux as the Guest OS Type:, and then Other Linux kernel 2.6 as the Guest OS Version:. Click Next to continue.

  8. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  9. Here you’ll need to select the amount of RAM that will be dedicated to the guest operating system (Ubuntu). If your Mac has 512MB of RAM, you’ll want to select 256MB or a bit less. Below 128MB will make Ubuntu a bit slow. Users on the Parallels forums have also mentioned having trouble when allocating more than a gigabyte (1024MB) of RAM. Because I have 2GB in my MacBook Pro, I’ve opted to dedicate 512MB to Ubuntu – and both OS X and Ubuntu run very quickly. After you’ve selected an amount, click Next to continue.

  10. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  11. Select Create a new virtual hard disk and then click Next

  12. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  13. Now you’ll need to set the size of the “hard drive” that Ubuntu will use. It might be possible to select less than a gigabyte (1024) and still install Ubuntu, but there would be very little room left for anything else. I would suggest 2 or more gigs (2048) at a minimum.

    Review the differences between Expanding and Plain as a disk format. Parallels suggests using Expanding, and since I’ve only noticed a small difference in performance between the two, I would suggest it as well. Either way, don’t stress out over this decision too much – you can convert from one format to the other, using Parallels Image Tool, if you ever need to. Click Next when you’re ready to continue.


  14. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

  15. Now you’ll need to select a location for the file that serves as the Ubuntu hard drive. The default location is always a good choice, but you can change this location if you’d like. Click Next to continue.

  16. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  17. Click YES if prompted

  18. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  19. Select Bridged Ethernet and then click Next

  20. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  21. Now you’ll need to select (if you have more than one) which of the adapters will provide Ubuntu with its network (Internet) connection. If you use AirPort to connect your Mac to the Internet, select it. If you use an Ethernet Adapter, select it. Both Wireless and Ethernet (cable) will work, just be sure to select the one you use to connect to the Internet. Don’t leave Default Adapter selected.

    note: if you sometimes use Ethernet, but right now you’re using Airport, choose Airport. You can always switch the “Internet source” later.


  22. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

  23. Give your new virtual machine a name (default is fine) and choose a location to save the configuration file (default is suggested). Finally – click Finish.

  24. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

Running Ubuntu for the first time

  1. The very first thing you have to do to run Ubuntu is change the CD-ROM setting in Parallels to point to the .iso file. Click CD/DVD-ROM 1

  2. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  3. Select Use image file and then navigate to your Ubuntu .iso file. Click OK after its selected.

  4. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  5. Click the green Power On button to start Ubuntu.
  6. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X

  7. You should now be presented with the Ubuntu boot screen. If your cursor doesn’t already have focus “inside” the Parallels (Ubuntu) window, click in that screen now. Hit Enter on your keyboard.

  8. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  9. Watch as Ubuntu boots….

  10. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  11. You’ll end up with the default Ubuntu desktop. It’s time to play! Try launching Firefox to make sure you’re connected to the Internet. Explore Ubuntu, and don’t worry too much about “breaking” anything. If you find that you’re not connected to the Internet, you can jump down to the Internet Troubleshooting part of this tutorial, or you can install Ubuntu and then troubleshoot the Internet issue. Don’t forget to try out full screen by selecting Fullscreen Mode in Parallels.

  12. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

Installing Ubuntu

  1. If you’ve decided you like what you see and you want to keep Ubuntu installed, double-click the Install icon on the desktop.

  2. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  3. Select your language and click Forward to continue

  4. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  5. Select your location/Time Zone and make sure that the time is set correctly. Click Forward when all the settings are correct.

  6. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  7. Select American English (a future tutorial will help you customize your Apple keyboard in Ubuntu) and then click Forward

  8. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  9. Enter the required information in each field. Remember that both the user name and password are case sensitive – so “username” and “Username” are not the same. Click Forward to continue.

  10. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  11. Select Erase entire disk: IDE1 master (hda) – size Virtual HDD (0) and then click Forward. Again, don’t worry, this is not deleting anything on your hard drive. It’s using up the space you assigned to Ubuntu when you set up Parallels.

  12. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  13. Review everything on the last screen. If you need to make changes, use the Back button. When you’re ready to install, click Install.

  14. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  15. Grab a cup of coffee. This doesn’t take too long, but it’s not fascinating enough to watch that attentively.

  16. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  17. When the installation has completed, you’ll be prompted to either restart or continue using the live CD. Because we need to completely power off Ubuntu (rather than restart), select Continue using the live CD.

  18. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  19. Now shut down Ubuntu
  20. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X

    Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X


    Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

  21. If Ubuntu doesn’t completely “turn off”, use the Power Off button in Parallels.
  22. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X

  23. Click Yes if prompted

  24. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

  25. Now that Ubuntu is installed, you’ll want to change the CD/DVD-ROM setting to no longer point to the .iso file. In Parallels, select CD/DVD-ROM 1. Choose Use CD/DVD-ROM from the Emulation window and click OK. The next time you start Ubuntu, you’ll have full use of your CD or DVD-ROM.

  26. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

Internet Troubleshooting

Ubuntu is very good at automatically detecting your Internet connection from OS X, whether it’s via Airport (wireless) or Ethernet (wired). If by chance you’re not online, check the following settings.

  1. Click System and scroll down to Administration. From the Administration down-down menu, select Networking.

  2. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  3. Enter your password

  4. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  5. Make sure that Ethernet connection is active. Also, make sure eth0 is selected from the Default gateway device: pull-down menu.

  6. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
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  7. Try surfing the Internet now and see if that’s all it took to fix the problem. If not, open a Terminal by selecting Applications, then Utilities and finally Terminal. Type the command ifconfig and then hit enter. In the eth0 section, look for an inet addr:. It will likely be something similar to 192.168.0.101. Whatever it is, write down the number.

  8. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

  9. Open the Network utility again, highlight the Ethernet entry and then select the DNS tab. Click Add from the DNS Servers section. Then enter the first 3 (three) ‘sets’ of numbers, and replace the last set with a 1 (one). For example, if the number you wrote down was 192.168.0.101, enter 192.168.0.1

    Hit Enter on your keyboard to save the DNS server, and then click OK.


  10. Ubuntu in Parallels for OS X
    Click to enlarge

  11. Once again, try to surf the Internet. If you’re still not connected, try looking for help at the Ubuntu community. Or, leave a message below and I’ll see if I can help. Because you’re using Parallels, you can return to OS X and research the problem there, without having to reboot over and over again.

  • Kelvin

    Thank you! Exactly what I needed and well written. I’ll be buying a new MacBook Pro in the next few days and this was the clincher. I can have my OS X and Ubuntu too!

    Thanks again,
    Kelvin

  • Kelvin,

    Glad it helped. You won’t regret that purchase – I LOVE my MacBook Pro :)

  • Great tutorial!

    Unfortunately, I can’t configure my network. I have an IPv6 address, and don’t know how to get an address like in your tutorial. Any hint?

  • Nicholas,

    Ahh you’re trying to stump me huh? :) OK I’ll bite – as it stands right now I have NO idea how to deal w/ an IPv6 address, but I will look into it this afternoon. It’s about time I learned a bit more about v6. I’ll email you w/ whatever I find out.

  • My goal in getting my MacBook was to have one small computer on which I could run all the OSs I use. Thanks for helping get Ubuntu up and running. I worked exactly as you described.

  • Adrian,

    That was one of my goals too! As it happens, I’ll probably never buy a PC again, I’m an Apple person from now on. Very glad to hear the tutorial helped –

    Ross

  • dave

    Trying to get Ubuntu running on my new iMac. Installed fine, but when i go to connect to the internet no beans. As i worked through the internet trouble shooting, i noticed my “inet addr:” looking nothing like your example. What i got looking more like the following…. “fe80::2d9 …” Honestly I have no clue what this means but thought it could have something to do w/ it. Any help would be greatly appreciated! Really enjoyed your write up,it was a great help until i hit this wall. Thanks.

  • Hey Dave –

    Are you on an IPv6 network? (that’s what the address looks like to me) If so, you and Nicholas (see above) may have the same problem. If you’re using a cable or DSL connection in the US, it’s unlikely that you are using IPv6. Are you trying to setup Airport or Ethernet? Try Ethernet first, wireless can add a layer of hassle that might be good to avoid until Eth works.

    Try to ping http://www.google.com and then an IP (72.14.207.99 for example). If you get a response from the IP, but not google.com, it’s your DNS (I had DNS issues a few times w/ Ubuntu in Parallels).

    I also suggested to Nicholas that he try http://forum.parallels.com/forum53.html – that’s the Parallels support forum for OS X. They seem pretty friendly.

    If any IPv6 folks happen to read this – please feel free to share some knowledge. Several of us would really appreciate it :)

  • Thank you very much for your excellent tutorial. I appreciate your time, skills, and effort in constructing the clearest tutorial I’ve ever seen.

    I now have Ubuntu and Windows XP on my Parallels Desktop on my iMac with Core 2 Duo. These OS’s and Mac OS X available at any time on my computer indeed makes it a dream machine!

    Bob

  • BigJoe

    Great article, the install on my MacBook was flawless.

    For anyone interested in tweaking the resolution, it’s very simple. Just edit the xorg.conf file and add whatever screen resolution you need.

    So, for my MacBook, I first found the screen resolution OSX uses (1280×800). I found that on the Display Preferences. Then edit the xorg.conf file and add that option.

    So, my xorg.conf went from:
    Modes “1024×768” “800×600” “640×480”
    to
    Modes “1280×800” “1024×768” “800×600” “640×480″

    Below are all the keystrokes you’ll need (for those not familiar with vi).

    Here I’m assuming that your screen resolution lines have 1024×768 as the first option. Also, means press Escape key.

    sudo vi /etc/X11/xorg.conf
    /1024
    hi”1280×800″
    n
    hi”1280×800″
    n
    hi”1280×800″
    n
    hi”1280×800″
    n
    hi”1280×800″
    n
    hi”1280×800”
    ZZ

    Hope this helps some people out. Now to figure out how to convert my Ubuntu Desktop install to a Server install (running server install explicitly caused hang at boot)

  • Devin Arnold

    oh no! Your tutorial was great, very clear, and I really liked it–but I am having one major problem. First, I did have to get the newer version of Ubuntu, (6.10), but other then that I’ve followed your instructions exactly… and unfortunately get the following text right after hitting enter on the ubuntu enter screen:

    ACPI:Unable to locate RSDP

    Now that is fairly odd, but after that the parallels screen just goes black for a long while, then loads bigger, with the cursor and tan color of ubuntu, and occasionally the actual ubuntu desktop background, but nothing more! Now, I did get it to fully load after a LONG time of letting it sit once, and I started installing it but it froze, and now I just can’t seem to get it past this point.

    My hardware shouldn’t be a problem, since i have a MBP with 2gigs ram, 100gb 7200 rpm hd, and it’s pretty new–haven’t even thrown it across the room or anything! Any suggestions?

  • Devin Arnold

    alright… I recently WAS able to actually install it, but it still flashes up the warning when it tries to start itself up that I mentioned before, and after that it is remarkably slow to actualy load.. though load it does now apparantly!

  • Agentpt

    Devin, I have encountered exactly the same problem as you, loading Kubuntu 6.10 on a Macbook. Did you manage to get it working. Any help will be greatly appreciated..

  • Agentpt

    Devin, I have encountered exactly the same problem as you, loading Kubuntu 6.10 on a Macbook. Did you manage to get it working. Any help will be greatly appreciated..

  • Hairy Ogre

    Hey, I bought a Macbook on Thursday, having never touched a Mac before. Your walkthrough was clean enough to get even me running correctly. Thanks for your time and effort. (I was the worst case scenario, so anyone should be able to do it!)

  • tom

    Excellent walkthrough, exactly what I needed. I had Ubuntu up and running in less than an hour. I had to fiddle some to get the screen resolution set to the 1280×800 that my MacBook Pro likes (the issue was getting permission to edit the xorg.conf file), but the comments here were helpful for that.

    So far, I haven’t been able to get Parallels/Ubuntu to recognize my SuperDrive. I’m not sure where the problem lies, with Parallels or Ubuntu. This is the first and only VM I have so far, so I don’t have any experience to go on.

    The MacBook is new as of Jan 2007, I’m wondering if I have a new driver that Parallels or Ubuntu is having a problem with.

  • David Darais

    I’m having the exact same problem as Devin with the rsdp error. If anybody figures out how to get it working please let me know. I’ve tried dapper and edgy of ubuntu with parallels build 3120 and have gotten no-where.

  • Justin

    I’m having the exact same problem as Devin with the rsdp error. If anybody figures out how to get it working please let me know. I’ve tried dapper and edgy of ubuntu with parallels build 3120 and have gotten no-where.

    I get the same RSDP error. However it doesn’t stop me from using the liveCD or installing and running Ubuntu in parallels. I even noticed that error message when booting the Ubuntu CD on my Toshiba laptop.

    So i’m guessing the RSDP error is not the cause of your problems..

    Very nice tutorial btw – Do you have any tips to get some kind of filesharing happening between OSX and Ubunut? I can get it happening in one direction using SMB Ubuntu->OSX, but I can’t browse the Ubuntu share from OSX – it keeps complaining about the authentication failing!

    Any info appreciated,

    Justin

  • Ryan

    Everytime I click power on to start the VM, it says there is no boot device available. My VM is set up exactly like the one in the picture and I cant even get ubuntu to install. I am using version 6.10 and ive got a macbook pro 2 gb of ram so I should be able to install this fine. Any help would be appreciated.

  • Chris

    Yah, i have exactly the same problem as Ryan going on. I have the same hardware he’s got with the same version of Ubuntu (6.10) and have tried booting from the .iso and burning a cd of Ubuntu and booting off that both to no avail. I feel like i’m losing my mind, so any help would be just terrific. thanks!

  • Ryan and Chris,

    So in step 2 of the running ubuntu for the first time you’ve selected an .iso file as the CD/DVD-ROM, and it still won’t boot at all? One thing I can suggest is to click the save button before clicking ‘power’ (step 3) so that the parallels config file is saved first, but I don’t think that should matter. Honestly, I’m kinda stumped myself – the folks in the Parallels forums would probably be the best place to ask…

  • Chris

    Well it looks like the problem exists somewhere between Parallels and Ubuntu version 6.10. Last night i downloaded Ubuntu 6.06.1 (ubuntu-6.06.1-desktop-i386.iso from
    http://mirrors.xmission.com/ubuntu-cd/dapper/) and it worked just like the how-to said. So far its working; there’s just a few little things acting wierd, but at least its installed!

    Has anyone had any issues with “Install Parallels Tools” with Ubuntu? With Win XP once the tools were installed you can move the mouse seemlessly between OS’s but the “Install Parallels Tools” command is ghosted in the menu.

    thanks for all the help!

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  • Great tutorial! Any suggestions on how to share a folder between OS X and Ubuntu?

    Thanks,
    Miguel Guhlin

  • Ryan

    Hey Nick, I just got your email and thanks for the reply. I got it worked, the problem was that I downloaded the wrong version of ubuntu. After I got the correct version, it worked like a charm. Thanks for the help.

  • Adam

    Thanks for the walkthrough. Extremely useful!

  • victor

    hey every one am new to linux and am trying really hard to learn everything by forums and everything i can find in google or youtube so far i have ubunty 6.10
    and i was trying to follow one of the post that was put here that seem’s easy todo but i guess that my windows worped mind just dont understand could some one please in detail information email me on how to edit the xorg file so that i may have 1280×800 resolution on my macbook it will be greatly apreciated
    thank you in advance

  • victor

    am sorry for the miss spelling am doing this without my glasses my email is damuskinous@gmail.com
    and thank’s again

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  • Brian

    Great tutorial!, Thanks!

    I have one issue: I edited the xorg.conf file to get 1440×900 resolution in my MacBook Pro but I can see this resolution in the screen resolution list. Is there anything else I need to do in order to get that resolution?

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  • Derek

    Great, I’ve been looking for an article like this for a long time. I’ve got a quad g5 with a 30″ display…But I need ubuntu for work (not sure I want to run ubuntu through vpc?). Does Parallels/Ubuntu support a 30″ display? If so, I’ll be picking up a new MacBook Pro w/Parallels soon.

  • Jeff

    Awesome page! Thanks for the help. I’ve been a Mac user for years and I wanted to try out Ubuntu. Looks very nice. If I didn’t enjoy OS X as much as I do I would definitely use Ubuntu as my main OS.

  • Bill

    I am glad I came across this site. For weeks I have been trying to put Ubuntu on my Macbook using Parallels. I tried several times with no success. After reading this tutorial, I discovered a couple things that I wasn’t doing correctly, and now have Ubuntu up and running! Thanks.

  • Ed

    I am having the exact same issue as Devin Arnold, except I have a MacBook.

  • PlatinumDruggie

    Oh thank you!! … I’ve been searching for this all over the internet!! You rock!! I can’t wait to see what the fuss is all about concerning Ubuntu!…

    Thanks again!

    PlatinumDruggie
    —-o-

  • Russell

    Thank you so much for this installation guide. I installed it on my Intel iMac.

  • Hey, I’ve been having the same problem Chirs, and others, have been having with the RSDP thing. I’ve got ubuntu-7.04-beta-desktop-i386.iso, which I installed properly, as-per this tutorial, and I’m still getting that error message. Any help? Anyone?

  • Josh

    I’m new to all of this, but you made it easy. Thanks for being so thorough. Do you have any advice about all of the updates available right after install of 6.10? They look optional, but I don’t know whether to install or not. Thanks.

  • A very good description even better than mine. If you would like to know how to customize your Ubuntu
    installation read my blog: http://svenand.blogdrive.com/archive/14.html

  • tokyoserver

    thanks a lot. trying w/ os 7.04!
    THX again

  • For anyone still struggling with trying to get Ubuntu 7.04 working with Parallels build 3188 because of a fleeting “ACPI: Unable to locate RSDP” error message, which turns into a black screen of death — then this is how I was finally able to get past it and install it:

    * In Parallels, go to “Edit -> Virtual Machine…”
    * Change the OS Type from Linux to “Solaris” & “Other Linux Kernel 2.6? to “Solaris (Other)”
    * Start Parallels by pressing the Green Play/Run button
    * Instead of hitting “Enter” at the next boot screen, then interrupt the boot startup sequence by hitting “function key (fn) + F4” keys.
    * When you get the “boot:” prompt, then type in “live vga=790” and hit enter in order to start the Ubuntu install process

    You should be able to get the gist for what to do next from the instructions above.

    I got the ultimate answers from this thread:
    http://forums.parallels.com/thread10625.html

    And this bug report thread started by Eric Kerby gave me hope that it was indeed possible to get past this annoying error:
    https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux-source-2.6.20/+bug/95830

    It also gives tons of info as to why it doesn’t work if you’re into that.

    Kirby questions the long-term implications of selecting Solaris instead of Linux, and so it remains to be seen what other types of unintended consequences may come up. We’ll see how it goes.

  • Two quick addendums to my previous post.
    * After installing Ubuntu, and shutting down, then you can change the OS Type back to “Linux” & “Other Linux Kernel 2.6?from “Solaris” & “Solaris (Other).”
    * Also, on start-up you’ll still see the “ACPI: Unable to locate RSDP” error come up and go to a black screen, but be patient with it as it’ll pass and eventually you’ll be able to log on with your username and password.

    Works great so far — except that I haven’t got an Internet connection up and running yet.

  • At the time of this posting, I couldn’t connect to the Internet with Ubuntu 7.04 & Parallels using the “Internet Troubleshooting” instructions alone.

    Ultimately what finally did the trick was to click on the double computer network icon in the upper right hand corner that had an exclamation mark indicating no network connection. This was easily fixed by selecting a wired network & it as able to automatically detect and connect to the wireless connection.

    The ultimate solution was found here:
    http://svenand.blogdrive.com/archive/50.html

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  • Morten Ravn

    Wonderful, now it’s working even with Ubuntu 7.04 and Parallels build 3188 – and online! Thanks to Kent Bye and do to the fact that I at the very top of this page overlooked this:

    “Update: this tutorial covers installing Ubuntu 6.06.1. If you’re looking for help installing Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) please see this tutorial.”

  • Mieru

    I have had a problem with some special character like @ or € because it didn’t type tehm. The solution was to enable the “Third level choosers key”; here is how:
    go to System->Preferences->Keyboard->Leyout Options
    open the third level chooser and check the “press the right Alt key to choose the 3° level”.
    I have tested only with the italian layout but it must works with all the layouts and the symbols that you type pressing the Alt key on Mac Os x.
    I hope it could be usefull.

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  • Jason

    Just wanted to say thanx – this was great and would have been completely lost without it – a complete idiots guide (for a complete idiot (me)!

    jas,

  • Jose Morales

    This tutorial is great! Thanks for the know-how. I have one question, though. I’ve been unable to get Ubuntu to recognize the Optical Drive. The VM is set to use it but I’ve tried to access it and Ubuntu tells me it doesn’t have and Optical Drive installed. Thanks for the Help.

  • zuoiz
  • I was also encountering the “Unable to locate RSDP” error. I found that interupting the grub and booting into failsafe, then running file system check (fsck) fixed my problems.

    Leads me to think the issue originates from the VM being shutdown incorrectly or ‘abruptly” ;)

  • very helpful tutorial, thank you!

  • This is perfect! My config is the exact same as yours, except with my ubuntu version being 7.10(no betas for me)…
    It works the same! This is something i did very funny: installed windows in the same fashion(parallels), then using wubi, partitioned the virtual windows to run linux(windows in osx, split with linux).. Its pretty col…

  • Great tutorial, thanks for the help.

  • Simon Söderberg

    I have tried now to install Ubuntu 9.04 on Paralells 4.0 and it works creating the VM, when i start the Ubuntu VM i get a starting screen where i choose language and then i can click:
    Try Ubuntu without making changes to your computer.
    Install Ubuntu.
    Check the disk for errors.
    Check the memory.
    Start from the first harddrive.
    (I have translated these alternatives from the swedish version so they might not be absolutely correct)

    And whatever of these alternatives i click it says “Error reading boot cd”